Erlang 4: Types (or lack thereof)

Introduction

Comments to the book "Learn You Some Erlang For Great Good" by Fred Hébert, Chapter 4 - Types (or lack thereof). Pattern matching is much easier to achieve in Erlang than in many other languages, but the syntax takes some time to get used to. Instead of if-else or similar conditional branching, in Erlang you simply use functional declarations with a pattern. Learning goals: Understand how Erlang's "crash first" philosophy and always accounting for errors works with dynamical typing to keep things safe. Challenges: See how the lack of static types does not mean that Erlang code is error prone.

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Erlang 3: Syntax in Functions

Introduction

Comments to the book "Learn You Some Erlang For Great Good" by Fred Hébert, Chapter 3 - Syntax in Functions. Pattern matching is much easier to achieve in Erlang than in many other languages, but the syntax takes some time to get used to. Instead of if-else or similar conditional branching, in Erlang you simply use functional declarations with a pattern. Learning goals: Being able to create pattern matching, retaining unbound vs unboundvariables, and how to work with guards. Challenges: Differences between unbound vs unboundvariables. Fully understanding how to work with guards.

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DoGr8 posted a comment in git-lfs - Git For Big Files
That sorted me out... THX!!!
Eric Eikrem posted a comment in Erlang 3: Syntax in Functions
You are right! Fixed. Thanks for heads-up
mammon88 posted a comment in Erlang 3: Syntax in Functions
You say that andalso, orelse can be nested inside guards. Example pls.
The Penguin posted a comment in Erlang 3: Syntax in Functions
Seems something's missing after "Running the code gives us:" ...
Erlanger posted a comment in Erlang 2: Modules
These Erlang articles are the same as those on https://erlangexplained.com? Good job, btw... ...